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I can personally testify that this is garbage advertising.

1. Just look at their website
2. If the 150,000 mile drain was true, why doesn't everyone use it? Reguardless of how good it is, the additive package will deplete at some point and too many combustion byproducts and wear paticles will enter the oil. Maybe with a bypass filter, but that's about it.

The only thing I can say is that if you decide to use it as a normal motor oil, the specifications it passes are impressive.
 

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While I don't think I would ever go 150,000 on one change, I read in an F-150 forum that I found when I did a little research about this that several people on there have gone well over 60K on one. They even offer a 60K mile filter that has magnets around the base of it to collect any particles that may come loose. The web site does state that if your vehicle uses oil, which most do to a slight degree, then you will have to possibly add or change sooner than that. But if it stays at the full line, and you have some way to change the filter without draining the oil, the fully synthetic blend they use will not break down. If you do a search you will find many who use it religiously and report oil sample tests that were cleaner after 20-30K than most oils after only about 3K. I personally have used the Mobile 1 fully synthetic and have been happy with it!
 

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First off, NEVER read a manufacturer website. Always seek unbiased information from independent third parties. I don't care what they say.

This is a guys Used Oil Analysis after 15,000 miles in a brand new Ford Ranger.

iron: 79
chromium: 3
lead: 1
tin: 0
aluminum: 3
nickel: 5
silver: 0
boron: 18
sodium: 5
magnesium: 285
calcium: 2838
barium: 0
phosphorus: 712
zinc: 836
molybdenum: 539
titanium: 0
vanadium: 0
potassium: 0
fuel: <1 %/vol
viscosity @ 40 C: 117.5
viscosity @ 100 C: 15.77
water: 0%/vol
soot/solids: 0.3
glycol: negative
TBN: 3.7
VI: 142

In summary, the iron levels are off the freaking chart. Levels like this usually indicate the start of a problem. Even is a new engine that is still breaking in.

Secondly, the TBN is absolutely horrible. How is the oil supposed to go much longer than this with just a low TBN?

This oil is supposed to be a 5w50 lubrication. Well, its not really much of a 50 weight anymore. It's nicely inside the spec for a 40 weight. And if it were still a 50 weight, the viscocity at 40 degrees would make it a 15w50. Instead, with everything combined, you have a 20w40. That's baffeling. The Viscocity Index supports this at a piss poor 142. Superior my @ss.

I've seen better reports on brand new engines with $4.00 per quart Mobil 1. Instead, you have a sucky report on an oil that cost $30 a quart and needs to be changed.

This guy is an idiot. He still supports the oil. He also puts neodymium magnets in his oil filter to catch ferrous metals. Obviously it isn't doing crap because of all the iron in the oil. Let's dig a little deeper shall well?

Neodymium magnet loose most of their magnetism near 100 degrees Celcius. This is the operational temperature of most engine oil. So, the magnet isn't doing crap. Also, engine oil flows at an incredibly fast and strong rate. This means when the oil comes up to temp and it flowing, everything will get swept away. At about 150 degrees, the magnets begin to deteriorate and break. A little Ranger could easily reach those temps with a decent load because of the numb motors Ford puts in.

However, this could be the reason for his elevated Iron and Boron levels. Both of these are elements found in a neodymium magnet. Nd2Fe14B

Who knows...



But an oil that shows high levels of wear, shears all to hell, and looses most of it's acid fighting capabilities after 15,000 miles for $30 a quart is a complete RIP OFF.

 

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wurk4fordboughttitan said:
First off, NEVER read a manufacturer website. Always seek unbiased information from independent third parties. I don't care what they say.

This is a guys Used Oil Analysis after 15,000 miles in a brand new Ford Ranger.

iron: 79
chromium: 3
lead: 1
tin: 0
aluminum: 3
nickel: 5
silver: 0
boron: 18
sodium: 5
magnesium: 285
calcium: 2838
barium: 0
phosphorus: 712
zinc: 836
molybdenum: 539
titanium: 0
vanadium: 0
potassium: 0
fuel: <1 %/vol
viscosity @ 40 C: 117.5
viscosity @ 100 C: 15.77
water: 0%/vol
soot/solids: 0.3
glycol: negative
TBN: 3.7
VI: 142

In summary, the iron levels are off the freaking chart. Levels like this usually indicate the start of a problem. Even is a new engine that is still breaking in.

Secondly, the TBN is absolutely horrible. How is the oil supposed to go much longer than this with just a low TBN?

This oil is supposed to be a 5w50 lubrication. Well, its not really much of a 50 weight anymore. It's nicely inside the spec for a 40 weight. And if it were still a 50 weight, the viscocity at 40 degrees would make it a 15w50. Instead, with everything combined, you have a 20w40. That's baffeling. The Viscocity Index supports this at a piss poor 142. Superior my @ss.

I've seen better reports on brand new engines with $4.00 per quart Mobil 1. Instead, you have a sucky report on an oil that cost $30 a quart and needs to be changed.

This guy is an idiot. He still supports the oil. He also puts neodymium magnets in his oil filter to catch ferrous metals. Obviously it isn't doing crap because of all the iron in the oil. Let's dig a little deeper shall well?

Neodymium magnet loose most of their magnetism near 100 degrees Celcius. This is the operational temperature of most engine oil. So, the magnet isn't doing crap. Also, engine oil flows at an incredibly fast and strong rate. This means when the oil comes up to temp and it flowing, everything will get swept away. At about 150 degrees, the magnets begin to deteriorate and break. A little Ranger could easily reach those temps with a decent load because of the numb motors Ford puts in.

However, this could be the reason for his elevated Iron and Boron levels. Both of these are elements found in a neodymium magnet. Nd2Fe14B

Who knows...



But an oil that shows high levels of wear, shears all to hell, and looses most of it's acid fighting capabilities after 15,000 miles for $30 a quart is a complete RIP OFF.

I LOVE it when a guy who knows what he's talking about backs it up, too.
Nice write up and data. You are kind of like the Tom Clancy of motor oil posts!
 

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would void your warrantee before you could say "150000 miles"
 

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SynLube Lube-4-Life Synthetic Super Lubricants
According to their site and several people in some other forums (F-150) you can go up to 150,000 miles between oil changes.
I have a Toyota Tundra with a hundred and seventy thousand miles on it and it has had synlube in it the whole time the problem is I'm having trouble on their website trying to order more of their product and I was wondering if it is okay to switch back to regular synthetic oil without causing any damage if anyone can help me with this and give me some answers it would be much appreciated
 
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