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Can I add regular air to these tires or must I return to the dealer. I never thought of this when buying a vechile before. LOL>
 

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When co2 hits the nitro the nitro disapates so yes you can fill them up with co2 but it just cancels the nitro in that tire. Problem for me as well because the dealer put nitro in mine and I have my own air compressor.
 

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You can use regular air with no problem. After all, air is 78% nitrogen. The only real advantage of nitrogen is that it is dry, and temp stable. If you have no moisture you won't get oxidation.
 

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you can always (when you have to) put in air. the drawback is that you will then need to get to a nitro filling station and have the tire bled (preferably twice), then refilled with nitro. as noted the benefits of nitro are: heavier than air so it is more dense, less oxidation of rim (cause for air leaks), better mileage....

i ran it in my last truck for 5 years and have it now...

http://www.getnitrogen.org/

check here for all things nitro!!
 

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Nitrogen is more dense than air, so since tires are porous, the nitrogen is not supposed to leak through the tire's pores, so the pressure remains constant. Also, nitrogen is not sensitive to temperature fluctuations, so when it gets cold, the tire pressure does not decrease as it does with plain old air.
 

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Nitrogen is slightly less dense than air ( 79% N ). Nitrogen is 14, oxygen is 16 (didn't anyone take chemistry?). As SCR said , the only measureable advantage of N is no oxidation of the rubber (and no moisture).
A standard test for rubber R&D ,is exposure to ozone ( O 3) to test oxidation resistance.
(How many have been to the US Rubber test lab in Akron O ?).
 

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Sorry, didn't do well in chemistry. Road and Track said it doesn't escape through the pores like air. I assumed the density thing. Also, R&T says its not as temperature sensitive so the pressure stays up in the cold. Correct?
 

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It is true that N has a lower molecular weight than O but both molecules exist in the diatomic state, N2 and O2 with molecular weights of 28 and 32 , respectively. Based on this information it would appear at first look that O2 is the larger molecule because it is mistakenly assumed that molecular weight correlates with molecule size.

The diatomic state of the two molecules, instead of existing as spheres, exist as bean shapes where the molecules are longer than they are wide. The reason that O2 behaves as a smaller molecule than N2, despite its larger molecular weight, deals with its atomic electron cloud. The O2 electron cloud, due to the higher number of protons in its nucleus, is pulled tighter and denser by the greater charge of the O2 nucleus, much like cinching a belt across the "waist" of the molecule. The N2 molecule wears a larger belt size due to it weaker nucleus charge and behaves as a larger molecule than O2 with respect to gas permeation.

Although N2 has an apparent effective larger size, despite its smaller molecular weight, the size difference between the two is not worth a bucket of warm spit. The primary advantage of N2 is that it is not O2. Nitrogen is considered inert where oxygen is very reactive, think oxidation. The other advantage, as stated above, is that nitrogen is delivered to the tire in a dry state without water.
 

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Perhaps the biggest advantage of an N2 fill is that they put green caps on your valve stems. Other than that, I noticed nothing.
 

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It is true that N has a lower molecular weight than O but both molecules exist in the diatomic state, N2 and O2 with molecular weights of 28 and 32 , respectively. Based on this information it would appear at first look that O2 is the larger molecule because it is mistakenly assumed that molecular weight correlates with molecule size.

The diatomic state of the two molecules, instead of existing as spheres, exist as bean shapes where the molecules are longer than they are wide. The reason that O2 behaves as a smaller molecule than N2, despite its larger molecular weight, deals with its atomic electron cloud. The O2 electron cloud, due to the higher number of protons in its nucleus, is pulled tighter and denser by the greater charge of the O2 nucleus, much like cinching a belt across the "waist" of the molecule. The N2 molecule wears a larger belt size due to it weaker nucleus charge and behaves as a larger molecule than O2 with respect to gas permeation.

Although N2 has an apparent effective larger size, despite its smaller molecular weight, the size difference between the two is not worth a bucket of warm spit. The primary advantage of N2 is that it is not O2. Nitrogen is considered inert where oxygen is very reactive, think oxidation. The other advantage, as stated above, is that nitrogen is delivered to the tire in a dry state without water.
If they were still handing out Shift_ titles I would recommend yours be Shift_Professor. Please tell me you didn't just copy and paste that from somewhere.
 
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