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Discussion Starter #1
I need help figuring out why I can't get VHT wheel paint to go on right.

I ordered primer, satin black and clear VHT wheel spray paint. This was after I tried to use Duplicolor wheel spray paint over the top of an off brand primer. Both VHT and Duplicolor paint left a coarse powdery residue. I had to sand both of them down to get rid of the residue. I switched to the full set of VHT paints thinking that the wheel paints need a special primer and my off brand primer wasn't good enough.

The first time with Duplicolor the temperature was in the 80's with humidity in the 20's and the Duplicolor was applied after waiting 1 hour for the primer to dry. The primer went on without any problem. This was on wheel #1.

Today, with the VHT wheel paint I followed their instructions and applied the satin black to wheel #2 about 15 minutes after the VHT primer was laid down. The primer was dry to the touch. The residue showed up after the first coat of satin black. VHT instructions on all three cans (primer, satin black and clear) say that subsequent coats can be applied after 10 minutes and all coats must be applied within an hour. The temperature today was in the 60's with humidity in the 30's. I'm still within the required climate range.

Thinking it was a problem with not letting the prior coat dry I then went back to wheel #1 and lightly sanded it (to remove the Duplicolor residue) and applied a coat of VHT satin black. Same effect: residue. This was on a wheel that had two weeks to dry.

Disgusted with the results I sanded wheel #1 down again and this time applied Krylon indoor/outdoor (that had been sitting in my garage for a good 5 years!). It went on without any issues.

What am I doing wrong? Given how much the VHT paint costs I would like to use it. But not if it takes this much effort with such poor results.

By the way, VHT is owned by Duplicolor. So the same results with those brands doesn't surprise me.
 

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Discussion Starter #3
I may give that a try. The worst that can happen is that I have to sand the clear cloat and the black coat.
 

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The problem with the wheel paint is it has a lot of high solid's in it to cover a lot of area quickly and to be tough to deal with the brake dust.
The residue is the high solid's standing on end instead of laying flat on the wheel. The clear will seal them to the wheel and look more uniform.
 

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Discussion Starter #5
Maybe it's how I'm spraying then. The surface that always seem to get the residue is the part that is curved and does not face out towards me. I try to get as perpendicular to it as I can but it's not possible to get 90 degrees from it. I also wonder if perhaps I'm holding the can too far away (about 15"). These are 20 year old steel wheels from my Ranger, not the Titan wheels.

Based on my experience, the next time I decide I want the wheels a different color I'll take them to someone to get powder coated. :(
 
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